Artists on Art: Heather MacRae on Leah Dalton
Oct28

Artists on Art: Heather MacRae on Leah Dalton

It was pouring rain, the shirt drenching kind. The kind that makes Savannah frenzied and the Spanish moss glisten with that supernatural grey-green color.  This was the tail end of Tropical Storm Julia, before all the chaos of Hurricane Matthew. I took a wrong turn and ended up behind a school letting out. I was trapped in front of a Hyundai and behind a minivan sporting the delightful window decals that represent all the members of...

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Dear Savannah, Stop Asking Artists for Free Art
Aug25

Dear Savannah, Stop Asking Artists for Free Art

Imagine working your 40 hour work week, and then being asked to hand over your paycheck to charity. What are you feeling right now? I bet it’s similar to what most artists feel every time someone asks us to donate to this week’s charitable event. This occurrence is an epidemic here in Savannah. I’m entering my eighth year living and working in the Hostess City. Before the Southeast, I lived in the rustbelt of Ohio, steeped in a mighty...

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Artists on Art: Painter Heather MacRae visits sculptor Stephen Angell’s home studio
Jul03

Artists on Art: Painter Heather MacRae visits sculptor Stephen Angell’s home studio

  The trees loomed, arching over the car, and as we got farther from the highway the dense green of the flora began to obscure our view of the morning’s low grey sky. We turned down a pebbled road, driving slowly, checking each mailbox’s number. Suddenly we realized we were right near the water. As we approached the house, the dense greenery parted and a small one story home came into view. Our anticipation sat with us like...

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Artists on Art: Lisa D. Watson on the magic and business of folk art
Jun16

Artists on Art: Lisa D. Watson on the magic and business of folk art

I was a foreigner to steamy Georgia when my friend drove me a few hours to Rabbittown, Georgia from Atlanta. The perspiration was worth it as we approached a hill of awe-inspiring whirligigs. It was 1994 and folk art was hot in the South. I was an outlander to the southern trend but soon appreciated its charm and especially the artist R. A. Miller (1912 – 2006). My whirligig broke down in sunny California, but I still have the...

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Discovering the Mothers of Gynecology Through Art
May30

Discovering the Mothers of Gynecology Through Art

  I currently work for the Telfair Museums’ Owens-Thomas House and research things that relate to the history of this museum. During the month of March, which is Women’s History Month, I researched the experiences of enslaved women. During this time I stumbled upon the book Birthing a Slave: Motherhood and Medicine in the Antebellum South by Marie Jenkins Schwartz. (1) The cover of the book captivated me and led me to some of the...

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Mel Gibson & macaroni sunshine: A studio visit with Justin Armstrong
May29

Mel Gibson & macaroni sunshine: A studio visit with Justin Armstrong

The first time I visited Justin Armstrong’s studio at Alexander Hall, he was standing on top of a pile of Mel Gibson photos and Monopoly money with a giant grin on his face. The hallways were clogged with people, but despite his urging that it wasn’t an installation – “Hi! I’m Justin! Do you want to walk on Mel Gibson?” – few crossed his threshold. If they had, they would’ve seen the gigantic bags of potting mix, the Legos, the...

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